New Book Notes: NT Use of OT, and verbal aspect

October 25, 2008

Preliminary notice: I just received review copies of two new books from Zondervan (both 2008). A more complete review will appear in due time (once I have time to read them!).

I’ve mentioned Con Campbell’s Basics of Verbal Aspect in Biblical Greek before, so I’ll not say more at this point. (I have read it; I just need to write a more formal review.)

Campbell, Verbal Aspect, cover

The second is Three Views on the NT Use of the OT by Walt Kaiser, Darrell Bock, and Peter Enns.

3Views.jpg

This is an important topic and well-deserving of a 3-views book. I’m not sure that “3” is the magic number here! There are more than three major views on this subject to be sure. It will be interesting to see how the selection plays out.

I know Kaiser’s view well. Bock, to my knowledge, hasn’t written a substantive treatment of his own view before. (Yes, I know he wrote a two-part survey in BibSac many years ago, but there he opted for an eclectic view and didn’t really argue for a particular position very extensively. It was a very helpful survey at the time; perhaps the intro chapter in this new book by Jonathan Lunde will take it’s place? As to Enns, he has become well-known as a result of his dismissal from Westminster, but I’ve not read him specifically on this subject. Each of these three men defend their own position and then respond to the other two in about six pages in the usual “3-views” approach. (There is no sur-rejoinder; the responses are “one way.”)

The book includes two other chapters. The intro by Jonathan Lunde is “An Intro to the Central Questions…” (35 pgs). There is also a conclusion by Kenneth Berding, “An Analysis of Three Views…” (10 pgs).

With that overview, based only on flipping through the pages, I now need to go read it.

I can add one other preliminary note: this is an example of “cheap” publishing (perhaps I should say “economical”). There are no blank pages in the front or back of the book as is customary. The book feels light for its size, so the paper probably isn’t high grade. And most notably, there is not even a blurb to identify the six people on the cover. Most readers will recognize Kaiser and Bock as “household names” in biblical studies, and perhaps Enns, but who are the other three listed as editors on the front cover? Stan Gundry may be recognized (though why the series ed. gets his name on the cover is a mystery), but most will not recognize Lunde or Berding. Apparently saving paper is more important is this book than telling the reader who the authors are. (For the curious, and to save you a quick “google,” both Lunde and Berding teach at Talbot.)

But that’s not what’s really important; don’t let my “nits” detract from what I anticipate could be a very good book.

4 responses to New Book Notes: NT Use of OT, and verbal aspect

  1. I just got Campbell’s book as well and I’m waiting for some time to read it. Hopefully over Thanksgiving break.

  2. Peter Enns’ Inspiration and Incarnation: Evangelicals and the Problem of the Old Testament is one of my favorite books that I have ever read.

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